Restore Your Freedom

Disorders of the pelvic floor are common with sufferers experiencing a loss of freedom and control

Facts and statistics

About bowel incontinence

  • Studies suggest that in the UK "major faecal incontinence" affects 1.4% of the general population over 40 years old and constipation affects between 3% and 15% of the population.1
  • Bowel incontinence affects up to 20% of Australian men up to 12.9% of Australian women.2
  • Bladder incontinence affects up to 13% of Australian men and up to 37% of Australian women.3
  • Bowel incontinence is one of the three major causes (along with decreased mobility and dementia) for admittance to a residential aged care facility.4
  • Around 77% of nursing home residents in Australia are affected by incontinence. 5
  • In 2002 the American-based International Federation for Gastrointestinal Disorders surveyed people who live with medically diagnosed Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and found that 25% of respondents with IBS reported loss of bowel control.6

About bladder incontinence

  • In 1998 the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that bladder control problems affect more than 200 million people worldwide.7
  • The WHO also said that bladder incontinence is a largely preventable and treatable condition and that it's "certainly not an inevitable consequence of ageing," adding that "the most typical reaction exhibited by patients when they are diagnosed with poor bladder control was not fear nor disbelief, but relief."8
  • In 2004 an American survey (by the National Association for Continence) reported that women wait 6.5 years and men 4.2 years after beginning to experience bladder control problems before seeing a healthcare professional.9

More facts and figures about bowel and bladder incontinence from the UK and Australia.

Australia

UK

  1. Jarret, M.E.D. et al. Systematic review of sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence and constipation. British Journal of Surgery 2004; 91: 1559-1569. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109630867/ABSTRACT?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0. (Abstract available. Article accessed 21.12.2006)
  2. Continence Foundation - About Incontinence - Facts and Stats http://www.continence.org.au/health_facts.html
  3. Continence Foundation - About Incontinence - Facts and Stats http://www.continence.org.au/health_facts.html
  4. Continence Foundation - About Incontinence - Facts and Stats http://www.continence.org.au/health_facts.html
  5. Continence Foundation - About Incontinence - Facts and Stats http://www.continence.org.au/health_facts.html
  6. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. IBS in the Real World. IBS Research Findings by IFFGD. August 2002. (Accessed 12.10.2006.)
  7. World Health Organization Calls First International Consultation on Incontinence. Press Release WHO/49, 1 July 1998. http://www.who.int/inf-pr-1998/en/pr98-49.html (Accessed 12.10.2006)
  8. World Health Organization Calls First International Consultation on Incontinence. Press Release WHO/49, 1 July 1998. http://www.who.int/inf-pr-1998/en/pr98-49.html (Accessed 12.10.2006)
  9. Denis, L. et al. Continence Promotion: Prevention, Education and Organisation. Abrams, et al (eds) Third International Consultation on Incontinence 2004: Monaco; vol 1, p43.

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